Agile

Scrum

Scrum is an iterative, incremental  framework for project management and agile software development. Although the word is not an acronym, some companies implementing the process have been known to spell it with capital letters as SCRUM. This may be due to one of Ken Schwaber’s early papers, which capitalized SCRUM in the title.[1]

Although Scrum was intended for management of software development projects, it can be used to run software maintenance teams, or as a general project/program management approach.

Certified ScrumMasters on staff with more than 7 years of experience running Scrum Teams.

XP (Xtreme Programming)

Extreme Programming emphasizes teamwork. Managers, customers, and developers are all equal partners in a collaborative team. Extreme Programming implements a simple, yet effective environment enabling teams to become highly productive. The team self-organizes around the problem to solve it as efficiently as possible.
Extreme Programming improves a software project in five essential ways; communication, simplicity, feedback, respect, and courage.

Kanban

Kanban (meaning “signboard” or “billboard”) is a concept related to lean and just-in-time (JIT) production. According to Taiichi Ohno, the man credited with developing JIT, kanban is a means through which JIT is achieved.

Kanban is a signaling system to trigger action. As its name suggests, kanban historically uses cards to signal the need for an item. However, other devices such as plastic markers (kanban squares), balls (often golf balls), an empty part transport trolley, or simply a floor location can also be used to trigger the movement, production, or supply of a unit in a factory.

Kanban has been morphed from the traditional manufacturing sense to the software industry to help increase productivity and visibility into a software project.